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View Full Version : TRF Rugby League 3 Preview Now Online



locksley
21-02-10, 05:20 PM
Hey Fellas,

Dan and I were lucky enough to get our hands on Rugby League 3 for a day thanks to Roger Hulley of Alternative Software. We played the game to death and literally had to be dragged away when Alternative's offices closed.

I was no fan of Rugby League 2 (In fact I HATED it with a passion) but Sidhe might just have nailed it this time around with Rugby League 3.

Anyway, enough talk. Click on the link below to read Dan's EXCLUSIVE trf preview.... oh, and maybe watch the exclusive footage we captured from the game! Did I forget to mention that? ;)

Enjoy


Lox

TRF Exclusive Rugby League 3 Preview (http://www.locksley.350.com/rl3.htm)

Olyy
21-02-10, 05:46 PM
Great review!
The videos like good as well, everything looks so much smoother in game, compared to the clunkiness of RL2
Roll on next month, i can't wait

Radman
21-02-10, 06:35 PM
Good preview. I hope you don't mind, I posted it up on the Sidhe forums for all to see. :)

Radman
21-02-10, 07:14 PM
Just wondering, Dan do you have a copy of the preview you can copy and paste on here as some of it is unable to be viewed properly unless you right click and click on 'view source' it seems.

St Helens RLFC
21-02-10, 07:38 PM
As long as it's credited to TRF, here you go:

The Rugby Forum is proud to bring you an exclusive preview of the up and coming Rugby League 3 for the Wii, to be published in the UK by Alternative Software and Down Under by HES. Myself and the legendary Locksley made our way across the Pennines to Castleford on Friday 19th February to take a look at the latest oval ball offering in the video gaming world.

It’s no secret that Rugby League 2 was not a popular game on TRF. After a solid start with the excellent Rugby League, Rugby League 2 represented (in my view and that of many) a backwards step with some sluggish movement and lack of response from players.

I am delighted to say that having spent 5 hours on Rugby League 3; we are back on track to have a fantastically playable and fun game again. As soon as our first game, pitting St Helens against fierce rivals Wigan, kicked off, the differences were in evidence immediately. Smooth and rapid turns ensure that the days of being caught directly at the play of the ball should, providing you use the ball wisely, be over. SIDHE have clearly spent a lot of time refining the complaints that were levelled at the second game, because these changes are evident almost immediately. It’s a lot crisper and everything feels 100% more responsive. It represents a significant improvement on RL2 already.

The widely ridiculed sidestep has now long gone. Instead of skating, there has been a noticeable animation included for the sidestep and it works effectively. Sean Long stepped in and out, and in and out twice to score one try against my well set defence. It doesn’t look as natural as, say Rugby 2006’s sidestep, but it is definitely a massive improvement on the previous attempts and actually feels as though there is some skill involved in making a step successfully, and it does genuinely open up defences. Indeed, all animations have been polished up and the game was motion captured.

There are several new features. One I particularly liked was the introduction of three new icons. You will notice these if you play the exclusive TRF videos on Locksley’s website. They appear above specific players. Speedsters, enforcers and playmakers. Playmakers are the creative sparks, enforcers are the tough, hard hitting forwards (Cunningham and Peacock being two notable examples) and speedsters the jet heeled backs who can break the line at speed.

This sort of differentiation, similar to an idea the EA Rugby games once implemented but for me more accessible and realistic, is a perfect examples of how Rugby League 3 has a new tactical approach. When in attack and defence you can now make different calls to the tactics, but be prepared to fall flat on your face if you get it wrong! One of the videos shows Locksley pull his full back into the defensive line – it also shows me make a break, offload through a gap and go racing under the sticks with no fullback in place. You can drop your full back and wingers back deep and you can also put on some aggressive defence. Careful though – too much so and you’ll start removing heads, and high tackles flew in during a State of Origin match!

You can do the same in attack – you can bring your full back into the attacking line, you can pass to a playmaker in order for a kick and you can, importantly, set yourself up for a drop goal (or if you must, field goal.) This can be done on the fly. I struggled to do it myself, but then again I was using the Wiimote, a Nunchuck and I hadn’t grasped the controls. There are definitely more layers of tactical depth on the field.

The video refereeing system has been updated slightly, with the first try we scored on our very first game, a try was awarded for “the benefit of the doubt.” Whilst we didn’t see it, we are told that a “refs call” can also be given, in which case two players will engage in a button pressing game to fill a meter. Whoever gets there first will get the decision. We didn’t see it but it sounds fun and a few friends around could see that degenerating into some quality arguing!
The franchise mode, which was widely accepted as being a success last time out, is also back. It is here you will be greeted with a wide array of statistics and records. These actually belong to your club. However, if your super franchise happens to beat any of these records, they’ll be updated. The potential to make history is yours. The franchise mode has changed a lot yet changed so little. You can still get the big boot if your team underperforms, you still have a salary cap to stick to and you still have to right to bring in new players as and when. Thankfully you can now bring in players from different hemispheres. Right away this makes everything far more enjoyable for the Super League player as we can now lure the NRL players away from home.

You can also tinker with your training schedule, you can lay out what you want your team to work on over a period of a month in advance, such as kicking drills one day, fitness another, there were six options in total. You can also opt to be the national team coach and have the right to pick the players you want. This mode was pretty good last time around, and having played through I don’t see any concerns, it looks like it will be extremely addictive.

Of course, with this game being Wii only, it involves getting used to some new controls. The principle is the same, you press a button to burst through the would be tacklers and “hit” the ball up, you need to pass the ball left or right. I played all my games on the Wii mote and whilst I won’t deny it takes some getting used to, by the time I was dragged away from the console I was able to throw balls left and right. It needs some practice, and there is a tutorial in showing you how to make the desired moves. As you can see by some of the tries I scored though, there’s not much wrong with my passing! To pass, it was a gentle flick of the remote in the direction you want. I liked the kicking in particular, you do that by pressing A or whatever method of kick you want, before keeping it held down and flicking the Wiimote in an upward direction. Tackling is done with the A button. It’s hard for me to run through the controls as there is a much greater level of depth involved and as such it is going to take practice to learn the advanced moves. You can pick up and play though.

Critically, the AI has improved lots and the defence requires more input from you. RL2 was perceived as being “too easy” and the defence did a lot for you. Whilst there is the natural cover of the defence sliding across, it’s your responsibility to get it right and if you go away and make a sandwich, you will have conceded tries. That wasn’t the case on RL2. There are a lot of gaps and breaks that appear and happen, it all feels very natural. Locksley put a game on “Legend” difficulty and lost 44-0, he got a hammering. It will take skill to beat the computer.

Criticisms? Only very small ones. I still feel the base of the scrum needs work as it is easy to make 20 yards every time, especially with a quick scrum half but that’s something you can try and counteract with your defence. There were also a fair few injuries, but it is a tough sport and you can turn injuries off.

Overall I am extremely impressed with RL3. It has ironed out the annoyances that ruined the last game and the controls are fun. I have very few complaints. Fair play to SIDHE who have clearly listened and have changed the bugbears. This has been 2 years in the making and you can tell. It should be out either in late March or early April. Get involved.

(All videos with thanks to Alternative Software and SIDHE. Please note that the videos were uploaded on a standard DVD recorder and as such the game actually looks way sharper and crisper on a proper TV.)

St Helens RLFC
21-02-10, 07:38 PM
As long as it's credited to TRF, here you go:

The Rugby Forum is proud to bring you an exclusive preview of the up and coming Rugby League 3 for the Wii, to be published in the UK by Alternative Software and Down Under by HES. Myself and the legendary Locksley made our way across the Pennines to Castleford on Friday 19th February to take a look at the latest oval ball offering in the video gaming world.

It’s no secret that Rugby League 2 was not a popular game on TRF. After a solid start with the excellent Rugby League, Rugby League 2 represented (in my view and that of many) a backwards step with some sluggish movement and lack of response from players.

I am delighted to say that having spent 5 hours on Rugby League 3; we are back on track to have a fantastically playable and fun game again. As soon as our first game, pitting St Helens against fierce rivals Wigan, kicked off, the differences were in evidence immediately. Smooth and rapid turns ensure that the days of being caught directly at the play of the ball should, providing you use the ball wisely, be over. SIDHE have clearly spent a lot of time refining the complaints that were levelled at the second game, because these changes are evident almost immediately. It’s a lot crisper and everything feels 100% more responsive. It represents a significant improvement on RL2 already.

The widely ridiculed sidestep has now long gone. Instead of skating, there has been a noticeable animation included for the sidestep and it works effectively. Sean Long stepped in and out, and in and out twice to score one try against my well set defence. It doesn’t look as natural as, say Rugby 2006’s sidestep, but it is definitely a massive improvement on the previous attempts and actually feels as though there is some skill involved in making a step successfully, and it does genuinely open up defences. Indeed, all animations have been polished up and the game was motion captured.

There are several new features. One I particularly liked was the introduction of three new icons. You will notice these if you play the exclusive TRF videos on Locksley’s website. They appear above specific players. Speedsters, enforcers and playmakers. Playmakers are the creative sparks, enforcers are the tough, hard hitting forwards (Cunningham and Peacock being two notable examples) and speedsters the jet heeled backs who can break the line at speed.

This sort of differentiation, similar to an idea the EA Rugby games once implemented but for me more accessible and realistic, is a perfect examples of how Rugby League 3 has a new tactical approach. When in attack and defence you can now make different calls to the tactics, but be prepared to fall flat on your face if you get it wrong! One of the videos shows Locksley pull his full back into the defensive line – it also shows me make a break, offload through a gap and go racing under the sticks with no fullback in place. You can drop your full back and wingers back deep and you can also put on some aggressive defence. Careful though – too much so and you’ll start removing heads, and high tackles flew in during a State of Origin match!

You can do the same in attack – you can bring your full back into the attacking line, you can pass to a playmaker in order for a kick and you can, importantly, set yourself up for a drop goal (or if you must, field goal.) This can be done on the fly. I struggled to do it myself, but then again I was using the Wiimote, a Nunchuck and I hadn’t grasped the controls. There are definitely more layers of tactical depth on the field.

The video refereeing system has been updated slightly, with the first try we scored on our very first game, a try was awarded for “the benefit of the doubt.” Whilst we didn’t see it, we are told that a “refs call” can also be given, in which case two players will engage in a button pressing game to fill a meter. Whoever gets there first will get the decision. We didn’t see it but it sounds fun and a few friends around could see that degenerating into some quality arguing!
The franchise mode, which was widely accepted as being a success last time out, is also back. It is here you will be greeted with a wide array of statistics and records. These actually belong to your club. However, if your super franchise happens to beat any of these records, they’ll be updated. The potential to make history is yours. The franchise mode has changed a lot yet changed so little. You can still get the big boot if your team underperforms, you still have a salary cap to stick to and you still have to right to bring in new players as and when. Thankfully you can now bring in players from different hemispheres. Right away this makes everything far more enjoyable for the Super League player as we can now lure the NRL players away from home.

You can also tinker with your training schedule, you can lay out what you want your team to work on over a period of a month in advance, such as kicking drills one day, fitness another, there were six options in total. You can also opt to be the national team coach and have the right to pick the players you want. This mode was pretty good last time around, and having played through I don’t see any concerns, it looks like it will be extremely addictive.

Of course, with this game being Wii only, it involves getting used to some new controls. The principle is the same, you press a button to burst through the would be tacklers and “hit” the ball up, you need to pass the ball left or right. I played all my games on the Wii mote and whilst I won’t deny it takes some getting used to, by the time I was dragged away from the console I was able to throw balls left and right. It needs some practice, and there is a tutorial in showing you how to make the desired moves. As you can see by some of the tries I scored though, there’s not much wrong with my passing! To pass, it was a gentle flick of the remote in the direction you want. I liked the kicking in particular, you do that by pressing A or whatever method of kick you want, before keeping it held down and flicking the Wiimote in an upward direction. Tackling is done with the A button. It’s hard for me to run through the controls as there is a much greater level of depth involved and as such it is going to take practice to learn the advanced moves. You can pick up and play though.

Critically, the AI has improved lots and the defence requires more input from you. RL2 was perceived as being “too easy” and the defence did a lot for you. Whilst there is the natural cover of the defence sliding across, it’s your responsibility to get it right and if you go away and make a sandwich, you will have conceded tries. That wasn’t the case on RL2. There are a lot of gaps and breaks that appear and happen, it all feels very natural. Locksley put a game on “Legend” difficulty and lost 44-0, he got a hammering. It will take skill to beat the computer.

Criticisms? Only very small ones. I still feel the base of the scrum needs work as it is easy to make 20 yards every time, especially with a quick scrum half but that’s something you can try and counteract with your defence. There were also a fair few injuries, but it is a tough sport and you can turn injuries off.

Overall I am extremely impressed with RL3. It has ironed out the annoyances that ruined the last game and the controls are fun. I have very few complaints. Fair play to SIDHE who have clearly listened and have changed the bugbears. This has been 2 years in the making and you can tell. It should be out either in late March or early April. Get involved.

(All videos with thanks to Alternative Software and SIDHE. Please note that the videos were uploaded on a standard DVD recorder and as such the game actually looks way sharper and crisper on a proper TV.)

GJ#1
21-02-10, 07:53 PM
So is this still only going to be on the Wii?

Radman
21-02-10, 08:05 PM
Thanks Dan. Just that layout you used seemed to cut off alot of text and I couldn't figure another way to view it.

@ GJ#1. For now, a PS3, 360 Rugby League game is in the works and Bigant studios seems to be the likely developer, we just haven't had confirmation yet.

St Helens RLFC
21-02-10, 08:10 PM
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (GJ#1 @ Feb 21 2010, 07:53 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}> ('index.php?act=findpost&pid=437843')</div>
So is this still only going to be on the Wii?[/b]

For now.

If it sells well I expect it&#39;ll come to a next gen console. Hopefully, anyway, as it&#39;s very good.

Nesreviac
21-02-10, 10:24 PM
I&#39;m quite impressed with whats been said about the game so far. Seems like a reasonably balanced review, well written. It&#39;s not enough to have me buy a Wii, but still if it goes anywhere near my console I&#39;ll be buying on day one.

esoj
22-02-10, 12:10 AM
nice job guys thanks again lox and dan for taking time to this on behalf of trf and the larger community as well. it&#39;s great to hear how much you guys love the game over rl2 and it seems a lot of improvements have been made to make this one a definite buy day 1. I believe it comes out march 18/19th in aus and nz my wii will be waiting.

CeeJay
22-02-10, 04:21 AM
Nice preview, sounds very promising.

I cant view the footage in its current format, is there anything I can to to watch it?

Radman
22-02-10, 05:25 AM
I played them through quicktime player so if you can get hold of that it should be sweet, just save the clips and then right click, then open with quicktime player.

esoj
22-02-10, 07:35 AM
I downloaded them and they played fine in windows media player. I don&#39;t think there is anything special about them format wise they should play in almost anything. some broswers could be a bit picky but that is why you download them they aren&#39;t that big. the videos were quite good some nice tries showing off quite a few things, the sidestep looks a lot better now probably being the stand out for me anyway.

Radman
22-02-10, 07:44 AM
Oh sweet, quicktime was the first one that worked for me.

I&#39;m looking forward to playing this alot more and I do think it is a good step in the right direction in all areas.

CeeJay
22-02-10, 09:09 AM
Thanks guys, got them working with quicktime.

The Brent Webb try from the offloads was cool.

Whats with passing the ball sound affects, lol.

St Helens RLFC
22-02-10, 08:02 PM
cheap plug/ I scored the Brent Webb try /cheap plug.


Locks hopes to be uploading some more videos either today or tomorrow.