PDA

View Full Version : Intresting article...



Vambo
23-02-08, 01:46 PM
Here (http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/sport/rugby/article3414706.ece)

I don't like this clown as a rule but he may actually having a point this time....

DR749
26-02-08, 09:06 PM
Makes sense to me.





Doc

An Tarbh
28-02-08, 04:12 PM
well we'll see how the likes of Keatley, Sexton and O'Connor develop before wheeling O'Gara out in his zimmer frame.

It also should be added that Stephen Jones is a complete and utter tool, this is a journalist who gave Parra 4/10 for his performance in Saturday's match so in terms of labeling anything that he writes as credible, you'd be skating on very thin ice.

Vambo
28-02-08, 04:32 PM
well we'll see how the likes of Keatley, Sexton and O'Connor develop before wheeling O'Gara out in his zimmer frame.

It also should be added that Stephen Jones is a complete and utter tool, this is a journalist who gave Parra 4/10 for his performance in Saturday's match so in terms of labeling anything that he writes as credible, you'd be skating on very thin ice.
[/b]


Agree 100% with you there mate.
Normally I treat his stuff with contempt but for once I thought he may have had a point in what he was saying.

snoopy snoopy dog dog
29-02-08, 03:59 PM
I'm no fan of Jones though he is capable of making good points. With regard this article, he's not a million miles away from being correct but he also neglects some key issues.



England and France can afford to have 12 and 14 teams in their respective competitions because of the population and playing numbers in those countries. This in turn leads to greater revenue streams which, in theory, can increase the quality of player at those clubs and results in larger attendences.



Wales, Scotland and Ireland don't have the population or market to put 10 competitive teams on the field every week. What they have done is try to stress quality over quantity and in about half a dozen cases, this has worked brilliantly. However, as Jones points out, by effectively limiting the chances of playing internationally to just those players plying their trade at home, it results in a smaller player pool than can be achieved. A byproduct of this is that an international elite is developed who are guaranteed game time to the detriment of younger players who must move abroad for regular rugby. As a result of moving abroad, these yonger players are ignored by the international coaches and a generation of players is effectively mismanaged.



Using Ireland as an example, Eddie O'Sullivan noted a similar point to Jones during the week. He can't see where the next generation of players is coming from. The solutions are simple. Don't discriminate against players who move to England or France. Utilize Connacht as the development province it was meant to be. Limit the influx of journeymen overseas players (like Michael Berne, Jake Parangati, Grant Webb, half of Connachts squad). Revive the Ireland 7s squad (as seems to be imminent). Finally and hardest of all to achieve, overhaul the All Ireland League.



As things stand, the AIL is dying a slow death and (primarly lower division) sides are consumed by self interest. The IRFU should look to stamp it's authority similar to how it promoted the provinces above the clubs in the early years of professionalism. A 2nd tier of 9/10 established clubs (ie Cork Con, Shannon, Clontarf, Ballymena etc) needs to be created on a geographical basis - say 3 each from Munster and Leinster, 2/3 from Ulster and one from Connacht. This competition can be played after the new year each season (leaving the opening part of the season exclusively the preserve of provincial A teams), featuring the best underage talent along with fringe players from the provinces and top club players making up the numbers. By asserting more influence over the club game and also seeing it become a semi professional league of a of a higher standard and with greater focus than it presently has, the pool of talent (both in terms of players and coaches) can be drastically increased.



In short, Jones has a point but hasn't even attempted to look at solutions, acknowledge the quality of the underage sides of recent years in Ireland and Wales or the sheer impossibility of producing more quality domestic sides in those counties he criticizes. All of which once again results in an unbalanced column designed almost exclusively to demonstrate the inate superiority (in Jones' opinion) of the Premiership.