Communication/organising as a 10

Discussion in 'General Rugby Union' started by Jon9999, Feb 7, 2020.

  1. Jon9999

    Jon9999 Academy Player

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    Organising/communication as a 10

    So a couple early in the season I was asked to switch from 12 to 10 and I’ve enjoyed it. After assessing my game over the last few months, I think it’s fair to say I’m not the fastest 10 and I’m not a maverick type player who’s going to throw long passes round my back or through my legs etc. However, I feel my skill set is pretty strong, I can pass off both hands, I can kick well, I enjoy getting the physical side of the game and getting off the line defensively. I feel like I can manage a game pretty well in terms of playing in the right parts of the field, I can sense when we have momentum or need to get momentum back and how to do it.

    I’ve been speaking to people about my game and one thing that’s come up a bit is that I need to be more vocal and organise/direct the players around me better. I watched a podcast recently where it basically said that players like Farrell and Sexton are the loudest players on the pitch whenever they play, they tell their scrum half what to do with the ball at the ruck etc in terms of what way to go. How important is this for a 10 and for those who play in the forwards or outside backs, is it important for you that you have a 10 who is loud and organises play well along with the 9? How important is it in terms of selection?

    Thank you.
     
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  3. Which Tyler

    Which Tyler First XV

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    It'll come with time and confidence.
    Speaking as a SH, I've mostly got my back to the FH, certainly once I've arrived where the ball is should be - so s/he needs to tell me what s/he wants, and when it's wanted. Anything after I've arrived at the breakdown, you have to tell me with words - preferably not many of them.
    There's nothing more useless than gesticulating at someone who can't see you. If you want quick ball, I've got to know where you are without spending time looking for you.

    As a converted IC, you should already know what your 12 (and further out) wants; you've just got to get used to doing it, rather than hinting to the 10 what they should be doing.
     
  4. big ginger 8

    big ginger 8 International

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    As a forward there's nothing worse than quiet halfbacks. Especially if you're just doing a round the corner system we just want to know where to set up. Knowing whether we're taking ball off 9, 10 or even just staying out of the way is really important. It lets the team play with direction, tempo and flow. Typically the earlier and louder this is communicated the better. Ideally as you're getting up from a ruck you'd know what your next job is. Typically what I think works best is having the call for the next phase gone out just before the current carrier initiates contact.
     
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  5. Old Hooker

    Old Hooker First XV

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    True, although the scrum half who treads on the right side of gobby hasn't been born yet.

    OP, this is an extract from a Times article talking about Youngs being dropped that might help......

    Yet if the England No 9 has become a helpless component rather than an on-field manager within the team, the fly half should be criticised for not getting a grip on his half-back partner. Fly halves are the men with the supposed vision. Waiting for the ball until the forwards have been driven backwards is not the vision of classic tens. George Ford played quite beautifully between his own tryline and the France 22 in the second half. It was largely his piercing kicking that enabled England to lay their siege.

    The forwards didn’t lift their heads, the scrum half simply stood back and waited while the fly half scurried here and there, growing ever more frustrated. Ford should have planted a boot up his scrum half’s backside, starter and replacement, to demand quicker ball, to work usable possession into the England midfield.
     
  6. Cruz_del_Sur

    Cruz_del_Sur First XV

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    I would say it is arguably the most important thing. The rest of the team can compensate for a 10 who cant tackle or can't kick.
    It is 10x more difficult to compensate for a 10 who can't lead.

    Some will argue others can do the job. I'd say not as effectively.
     
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