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Bruce_ma gooshvili

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If you can make ends meet on a lower salary (and your family are sympathetic to you prioritising health over wealth) I'd definitely recommend big public sector organisations in the UK. They will still say all rhe right things about wellbeing while acting in a way that intentionally tries to screw you over. The difference is that as long as you are professional in your conduct they can't touch you if you clock in, do your shift and leave on time at the end of your shift even if you are drowning and leave a task unfinished. As long as you have a manager you can notify of the situation at the earliest opportunity of any potential serious consequences with your workload then you are golden. . Obviously in the private sector if you do that they can make you reapply for your own job and show you the door, so you have to box clever.

So many organisations have far too many managers, the key is to find which one is accountable for your workload being done and to ensure there is an audit trail in writing of you notifying them when a workload may not be achievable or you are behind schedule. Then if something blows up in the organisations face it isn't you who is left holding the baby. A lot of people don't seem to realise that a manager-team member relationship is a two way thing in terms of responsibility. You can lean on a line manager while still showing a professional working attitude. I say all this as someone who personally is happy to bust a gut during my shift and cannot stand malingerers.

Similarly, if your department in the public sector does a restructure that screws you they typically have to consult you. So you can politely evidence your objections in an email about how this will make workloads unworkable / unachievable (same workload but less staff etc) and wheel out this email whenever your output is called into question (i.e. to show this problem was created by someone else and they should be the ones spoken to if someone has concerns).

I've got a backlog of tasks 4 years old (which I evidenced would take 10 years to clear even if my team received no new work) and I typically have a 4 week delay in responding to non-urgent emails. When inevitable complaints arise from outside my department people are incredibly understanding when you factually point out there has been a recent restructure and that you'd voiced concerns about it at the time. This is because this crap is the same everywhere so they can smell the truth in everything you say. They rarely even ask to speak to the manager because they know its probably futile.

Plus, once in these public sector organisations they often recruit on the cheap, making internally advertised movements much more achievable even if you don't quite have the skillset yet for a specific job. This is all magnified at present in a positive way by current labour shortages. Organisations can't fill posts and are terrified of losing more people.

Anyway, just some thoughts. I appreciate this isn't feasible for some folks. My first jobs were temping so I know what it's like to have almost zero rights in the workplace.
 

Bada-Bing!

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If you can make ends meet on a lower salary (and your family are sympathetic to you prioritising health over wealth) I'd definitely recommend big public sector organisations in the UK. They will still say all rhe right things about wellbeing while acting in a way that intentionally tries to screw you over. The difference is that as long as you are professional in your conduct they can't touch you if you clock in, do your shift and leave on time at the end of your shift even if you are drowning and leave a task unfinished. As long as you have a manager you can notify of the situation at the earliest opportunity of any potential serious consequences with your workload then you are golden. Obviously in the private sector if you do that they can make you reapply for your own job and show you the door, so you have to box clever.

So many organisations have far too many managers, the key is to find which one is accountable for your workload being done and to ensure there is an audit trail in writing of you notifying them when a workload may not be achievable or you are behind schedule. Then if something blows up in the organisations face it isn't you who is left holding the baby. A lot of people don't seem to realise that a manager-team member relationship is a two way thing in terms of responsibility. You can lean on a line manager while still showing a professional working attitude. I say all this as someone who personally is happy to bust a gut during my shift and cannot stand malingerers.

Similarly, if your department in the public sector does a restructure that screws you they typically have to consult you. So you can politely evidence your objections in an email about how this will make workloads unworkable / unachievable (same workload but less staff etc) and wheel out this email whenever your output is called into question (i.e. to show this problem was created by someone else and they should be the ones spoken to if someone has concerns).

I've got a backlog of tasks 4 years old (which I evidenced would take 10 years to clear even if my team received no new work) and I typically have a 4 week delay in responding to non-urgent emails. When inevitable complaints arise from outside my department people are incredibly understanding when you factually point out there has been a recent restructure and that you'd voiced concerns about it at the time. This is because this crap is the same everywhere so they can smell the truth in everything you say. They rarely even ask to speak to the manager because they know its probably futile.

Plus, once in these public sector organisations they often recruit on the cheap, making internally advertised movements much more achievable even if you don't quite have the skillset yet for a specific job. This is all magnified at present in a positive way by current labour shortages. Organisations can't fill posts and are terrified of losing more people.

Anyway, just some thoughts. I appreciate this isn't feasible for some folks. My first jobs were temping so I know what it's like to have almost zero rights in the workplace.
The only big public sector available in my line of work is HMRC. Lol. And that’s in a bigger mess than commercial firms. Most will work there to inspector level and then get pinched by the big firms to get the inside knowledge.

And it’s hard to accept a lower salary in any job. It’s a step down and the added pressure of seeing colleagues in your firm get promoted and paid more - even if they are **** and younger than you is an added mental pressure in itself. It’s either move up or get stuck at the level or move on to another firm. That’s where the whole rat race comes into it.

I see why a lot of peeps go self-employed and be their own boss. But then that comes with a whole lot of issues as well.
 

Bruce_ma gooshvili

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A new world record for low fertility rate in South Korea. Keep in mind a rate of 1.0 sees a population half in just 50 years. This could be the saving of the world environmentally if it turns out the horse hasn't already bolted the stable.

 

Bada-Bing!

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Sad, but don’t know how he “accidentally inhaled Chloroethane”? I understand it is a anaesthetic he was taking for the chronic neck pain he suffered from a car crash.

the whole OxyContin saga put me off taking pain meds when I had my operation a few years ago. They must have given me around 7-8 but wasn’t in that much pain to take them. Ended up just giving them straight back to a pharmacy post recovery.
 

Which Tyler

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It's #WorldMentalHealthDay today.

It's okay to not be okay.
It's okay to do the best you can today; even if it doesn't "seem" like much.

It's okay to talk.
It's okay to cry.
It's okay to just want companionable silence.

It's okay to lean on your support network (including those in here)151 BIA 34.
 

die_mole

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complete and utter lack of dawg. Should be ******* and ******** wherever he wants. Wouldn't make it in Philadelphia.

Have to say when I read this it was something I never came across. Living with Crohn's I've always been an advocate of increasing access to semi-public access restrooms as well as the cleanliness standards of them.
 

Bada-Bing!

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Interesting article on cancer.
Getting cancer is the result of a complex interaction between genetics, environmental factors, infections and age. The WHO estimates that a third of the world's cancer deaths are due to smoking tobacco, being overweight/obese, having a diet low in fruits and vegetables, being physically inactive and drinking excessive alcohol. And the incidence of cancer rises dramatically with age, due to the buildup of risks across a lifetime; the body's ability to repair itself reduces the older we get.
And then there's just bad luck (combined with genetics and unexplained factors): my father didn't smoke, didn't drink, exercised regularly and ate a diverse vegetarian diet. He wasn't overweight or unhealthy. He actually was an oncologist, and ended up being cared for by his colleagues and dying on the ward he once oversaw. So it's worth recognising that sometimes, there's only so much we can do to avoid disease. There's no role for shame, guilt or blame in illness.
How best, then, to reduce the chances of getting cancer and dying from it? At an individual level, public policy needs to continue to focus on making healthier choices more affordable and accessible: for instance, making it easier for people to walk or exercise with safe cycling paths, and ensuring that fruit and vegetables are subsidised and available. Getting vaccinated against HPV and hepatitis B is also important if you're in a high-risk group. And we need more awareness about the importance of screening. If you or someone you love are worried about changes in your health – such as weight loss, extreme fatigue, blood in your urine or stool, a persistent cough or lumps – get them checked without delay.
 

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