To Drop or not to Drop

Discussion in 'General Rugby Union' started by BokMagic, Nov 30, 2006.

  1. BokMagic

    BokMagic Guest

    From www.news24.com/News24/Sport/Rugby

    " Drop goals back in vogue

    Sydney- with the World Cup less than 10 months away, Wallabies coach John Connolysenses that the dropped goal is ready to rear its head yet again.

    His suspicions were heightenedwhen watching Springboks flyhalf Andre Pretorius slot 4 dropped goals in Saturday`s 25-14 defeat of England at Twickenham.

    A week earlier, teenage sensation Francois Steyn attempted a series of long-range efforts for the Springboksin the 1st Test against England.

    "It`s interesting,with South Africa at the moment, the way they`re playing, getting into position for dropped goals. I just wonder if the dropped goal is coming back into vogue."

    "I really felt like watching the Springboks against England that there was a dropped goal focus. Against England this series, South Africa had a plan to take the dropped goal with everything they kicked."

    Hmmm, sounds to me like someone is still having nightmares about a certain drop-goal during extra time of the 2003 World Cup. Should be interesting to get everyone`s views on this- is the drop-goal going to make a comeback at the RWC, is it a legitimate points-scoring weapon, is it the stuff that wins world cups, or is it simply an excuse for a poor game-plan?
     
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  3. Bullitt

    Bullitt Guest

    A team that plays for drop goal after drop goal after drop goal are boring and lifeless (read, London Irish). I passionately hate teams that use them as a main form of play and ******** to any team which scores more than 3 in an entire match.
     
  4. BokMagic

    BokMagic Guest

    Teh Mite, I`m actually not really a big fan of the drop-goal myself, I also prefer some attacking, creative rugby being played. But the fact remains that drop goals can win you World Cups. Another point to ponder- if the opposition is defending specifically against the potential drop goal, this does free up some spaces for the team in possession to exploit.

    I`m not saying that the RWC will be won or lost by a side putting over loads of drop-goals, but it can certainly add some spice, drama and intrigue to affairs. Wrt using the drop as your only form of attack, well that reminds me way too much of another sport called football- didn`t William Webb Ellis actually pick up the darn football and run with the thing because too much kicking frustrated the hell out of him?
     
  5. Fitzblado

    Fitzblado Guest

    Dont think it should be used as the main platform for scoreing but it is a great way of getting points on the board.It has and allways will be a oppertunistic decision by the no 10.If you cant break the try line then why not?Boks allways seem to use it very well eg. de beer.I have fond memories of Tom Kiernan scoreing one against England.
     
  6. DC

    DC Guest

    they should do away with drop goals, at least in my opinion, this would help to create more attacking rugby than sit at the 40 and drop it in..
     
  7. Well a couple of times Duncan Hodge has bailed us out with a drop goal, so I'm not against the odd one here or there. But none of this 4 in a game ballocks.
     
  8. An Tarbh

    An Tarbh Guest

    I don't agree with that, it's still a valuable way of keeping the scoreboard ticking over, mostly these days a lot of drops come when advantage is being played. It's a great asset to have at your disposal especially in a close game

    Plus how many games would have finished in stalemate over the years had it not been for the last minute drop goals, Ireland winning the triple crown in 1985, England winning their world cup, Stransky's drop goal in SA, even last week's finish to the Bristol Gloucester game was dramatic and had me as a neutral on the edge of my seat. But one of the most dramatic finishes to a match was Wales Ireland in 2003, Jones dropped a goal in the last minute and straight from the kickoff we regained the ball and ROG dropped a beauty to set up the grand slam match in Dublin.

    It just ****** me off when so many people diss the drop goal, or whinge at a team for winning a match by not playing a magnificent style of running rugby.

    Methinks Connolly is just trying some mind games with the Boks since they'll most likely meet in the quarter finals.
     
  9. BokMagic

    BokMagic Guest

    I reckon Connoly is maybe a wee bit nervous of using the old "kick the ball upfield, but not out to touch" trick that the Wallabies tried a couple of times this year, not wanting to give SA the put-ins in the line-out. They did this in possibly the ugliest Tri-nations match in living memory, this year`s 20-18 Oz victory in Sydney. Now, if Frans Steyn starts putting over the drops from halfway if the Wallabies keep up this "tactic", then they are in serious shite.

    Anyway, yes there is a lot of skill involved in the drop, remember that there is frequently a charging flanker coming straight at you, and not a lot of time to stick them over. If the drop was such an easy way of scoring points, why isn`t there substantially more?

    That said, I still believe that the place for the drop is actually as a surprise weapon, not a first-choice mode of attack.
     
  10. DC

    DC Guest

    I don't agree with that, it's still a valuable way of keeping the scoreboard ticking over, mostly these days a lot of drops come when advantage is being played. It's a great asset to have at your disposal especially in a close game

    Plus how many games would have finished in stalemate over the years had it not been for the last minute drop goals, Ireland winning the triple crown in 1985, England winning their world cup, Stransky's drop goal in SA, even last week's finish to the Bristol Gloucester game was dramatic and had me as a neutral on the edge of my seat. But one of the most dramatic finishes to a match was Wales Ireland in 2003, Jones dropped a goal in the last minute and straight from the kickoff we regained the ball and ROG dropped a beauty to set up the grand slam match in Dublin.

    It just ****** me off when so many people diss the drop goal, or whinge at a team for winning a match by not playing a magnificent style of running rugby.

    Methinks Connolly is just trying some mind games with the Boks since they'll most likely meet in the quarter finals.
    [/b][/quote]

    what brings the fans in though?

    drop goal or attacking rugby?
     
  11. An Tarbh

    An Tarbh Guest

    well the 74000 in the Millennium Stadium were going nowhere, same in Sydney, don't think anyone left early cause they only got 2 tries in 100 minutes of rugby.
     
  12. DC

    DC Guest

    yea but they werent sitting there watching someone drop in goal after goal after goal for 100 minutes..
     
  13. Ameen

    Ameen Guest

    4 drop goals a game is ******** mate, but South Africa can't win any other way :rolleyes:
     
  14. -JJ-

    -JJ- Guest

    Drop goals are fine. If a team would rather go for 3 instead of 7 thats their call.
     
  15. maybe recuding the points to two instead of three might make it a less potent weapon. I agree that sometimes it gets a little ridiculous.
     
  16. getofmeland

    getofmeland Guest

    Its still part of the game tho, its a set piece play in open play, like a well worked try, so why should they count for less, I have no problem with it, cos at the end of the day if one team is playing a mainly kicking game which plays to their strengths and the other place an attacking back line which is always looking for try's then your in for an interesting game as they both have to decided who to take into account each others strengths...
    So what if a game is won by a drop goal, well done for that team taking the risk trying to achieve it...

    The case with the England vs South Africa game is that England didnt combat there line of attack which was the drop goal so they got penalised... enuff said the drop goal is here to stay, and I think a certain aussie is scared however if it was Australia attempting drop goals and winning games I think it would be a different story... South Africa should be hailed for mastering it and England should be slated for not defending it...
     
  17. wykydron

    wykydron Guest

    What about reducing the area to take the drop goal to inside the opposition 22? Would this be pure stupidity or would it provoke a deeper thought before letting fly with a drop attempt? The way I am looking at it this would mean the attacking team still has to reach the oppositions 22 in order to score (short of a penalty) and encourage more attacking rugby. It would lessen the chance of a game turning into a kick and chase back and forth down the feild all day.
     
  18. An Tarbh

    An Tarbh Guest

    Seriously is there an epidemic of rugby matches being ruined by drop goals? I can understand the origins of this debate as it is something that Connolly fears ahead of the world cup and shows he's not too confident of getting that pool win in Cardiff. If we were to have that rule then you wouldn't have got the finishes to the 95 and 03 world cup finals, so what if they're scored from longer out, that just makes it more impressive imo.
     
  19. Dmx#1

    Dmx#1 Guest

    Drop goals are fine as long as they dont overdo it. I dont wanna watch a damn world cup game full of drop goals. I dont know what its called when have a game full of attack instead of a ton of drop goals. Oh yeah thats right, its called a 'fun' rugby game.I guess if u gotta win, you gotta win...But lets keep drop goals to a minimum!
     
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