Two dim questions...

Discussion in 'General Rugby Union' started by Dave Davies, Sep 11, 2019.

  1. Dave Davies

    Dave Davies Academy Player

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    Ok. Two terms I hear all the time, but can’t fathom. Can someone define these two terms?

    1. Bolter. My best guess is, untested youngster with lots of potential. Am I close?

    2. (Sounds like) “Noz,” though I suspect that’s not the spelling... best guess, someone almost nerdily into the minutiae and teeny details of the game and its history. Again, am I in the ballpark?

    Thanks y’all, sorry for the super basic queries!
     
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  3. TRF_Olyy

    TRF_Olyy English Arrogance

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    1. Yup, pretty much. Someone who you wouldn't necessarily expect to be picked for a side but who is in with a shout and would do well if given a shot.

    2. Nause. A geek/nerd, kind of. Someone who knows a lot about something/is really into it. Like if you've got a lineout forward who is obsessed with lineouts, studies all the opposition calls, can talk about them for hours etc. they'd call him a nause
     
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  4. Jabby

    Jabby First XV

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    1) pretty much spot on. I've always thought it came from "bolt out of the blue", a bit of a surprised inclusion

    2) i've never heard Nause used as a name for a person...only as an attribute, "that guy has a lot of nause" (when complimenting their inelegance)
     
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  5. BetseyTrotwood

    BetseyTrotwood Academy Player

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    2) yep, rhymes with pause. Short for ad nauseam, I guess?
     
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  6. Which Tyler

    Which Tyler First XV

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    Yep - not necessarily a youngster; but maybe someone who's had a season better than expected; or recently swapped sports for example - someone who's earned a shot, but may have been flying under the radar beforehand (eg McConnochie for England)
     
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  7. MarkyH

    MarkyH Bench Player

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    Nous, rhymes with mouse.

    https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/nous

    Curry, he's had a good game, showed a lot of nous at breakdown today.

    (nous = acumen, good judgement, knowledge)
     
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  8. TRF_Olyy

    TRF_Olyy English Arrogance

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    Different meaning there,
    It's definitely nause rhymes with pause in terms of them being an anorak.

    Presume you heard it off an interview or podcast, Dave?
    It's used pretty heavily in rugby circles - especially by the podcast usuals (Haskell et al)
     
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  9. Dave Davies

    Dave Davies Academy Player

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    Exactly, never heard it pronounced rhyming with mouse... interesting intersection of words and meaning, eh? I like the ad nauseam theory, seems to fit nicely with how I hear in on pods like Blood and Mud and Eggchasers, et al... :)
     
  10. RedruthRFC

    RedruthRFC First XV

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    Apparently I've been pronouncing it wrong! I thought it was pronounced it similarly (not exactly) to Norse and thought that I had heard others pronounce it that way. How do you pronounce its homophone meaning to screw up? I pronounce both the same way, so maybe I've been prronouncing that wrong too. Sounds like a good excuse to binge watch Only Fools & Horses - I'm sure Del Boy uses the phrase.
     
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  11. Leinster Fan

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    It's mostly been explained already but I'd say a bolter is someone who comes from nowhere to end up in contention. For example, a lot of journalists draw up potential 31 man squads a year out from the tournament (or whenever), if someone is a bolter they won't have been in any of them.
     
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  12. RedruthRFC

    RedruthRFC First XV

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    How far back does the phrase go? I think the first time I heard it used was to describe a relatively unknown Keith Earls when he was picked for the 1999 Lions tour.
     
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  13. Rinkadink

    Rinkadink Academy Player

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    Both have been described pretty well although I personally can't stand the term "bolter" - just irritates for some reason.

    Nause (It does rhyme with pause) is basically a sporty alternative for the word "nerd" and is more or less freely interchangeable with it, including in the slur/insult context.
     
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  14. Dave Davies

    Dave Davies Academy Player

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    See? This is why I love these forums. Y’all are the best. :)
     
  15. MarkyH

    MarkyH Bench Player

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    I've never heard nause at all in a Rugby sense, I must live a sheltered life :D Nous I've heard lots, and makes sense within a game of Rugby. Nause, as an Idiom can mean to 'nause someone out' so basically to go on so much you make them nauseous which would make sense if someone, on a podcast for example, was going on and on about a fact of rugby it made someone else bored...
     
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  16. MarkyH

    MarkyH Bench Player

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    You can have nous in a game or rugby. Nous at the breakdown, or in the lineout for example - 'Curry really showing some nous in the breakdown today'

    You have nause when someone is going on about a game of rugby - 'Haskell really goes on about the breakdown, he really nauses me out' or 'Haskell is a nause'
     
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  17. RugbyUSA

    RugbyUSA Academy Player

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    As a fellow American, thank you for asking those questions. :D
     
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  18. Dave Davies

    Dave Davies Academy Player

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    I finally heard "naus" (noz) and "nous" (nouse) on the same day... I think it was Haskell on House of Rugby using the first, and someone on The Thistle using the second. Double-whammy!
     
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