ANZAC DAY 08

Discussion in 'The Clubhouse Bar' started by paretrooper, Apr 23, 2008.

  1. paretrooper

    paretrooper Guest

    ANZAC day is commemorated by Australia and New Zealand on the 25th of april every year.
    Anzac Day marks the anniversary of the first major military action fought by Australian and
    New Zealand forces during the First World War. The acronym ANZAC stands for Australian
    and New Zealand Army Corps who landed at Gallipoli in turkey. Alas the British high command
    REALLY screwed the pooch on this one and a **** load of Aussie's and Kiwi's never came back
    so on the 25th Kiwi's and our brothers ( well more like our retarded cuzzies :D ) across the
    ditch remember the ones who did not come back.and the huge cluster **** that the pommes
    bestowed upon them. LEAST WE FORGET!.
     
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  3. DonBilly

    DonBilly Guest

    French soldiers were sent to Gallipoli and many died but this has not been kept in the collective memory, not like Verdun, le Chemin des Dames or la Somme.
     
  4. BLR

    BLR Guest

    Look paretrooper, just join the Federation of Australian states and we'll be done with it yeah?

    I wonder if people remember that New Zealanders were actually part of the Anzacs, I see on multiple websites talking about the ANZACS saying they were just Australians and the worst insult, a few years ago the douchebags in the AFL wanted to rename Subiaco Oval ANZAC oval....despite the fact the Kiwis don't play their retard sport...

    EDIT:DonBilly: You have to understand, this was our first major conflict as a unified nation(for Australia at least), it was our baptism of fire as a nation and the values shown by our fierce fighters of the ANZAC fighters shaped the culture of both our nations.
     
  5. DonBilly

    DonBilly Guest

    BLR, I know the importance and the symbolism attached to this battle for both Australia and New-Zealand.

    For Canadians, bar the French Canadians, the WWI is also perceived as one of the fundation of the Canadian national feeling.

    By the way I think that NZ soldiers had already fought in SA with the British Army during the Boers War around 1905.
     
  6. BLR

    BLR Guest

    So did the Australians, althought it was at the turn of the century, 1899-1902. Also I believe we fought basically as vassals in that war while in WW1 we fought largely under our own officers, Australia also fought in the Maori wars if you wanted to be pedantic about it, but it falls pretty much to the fact we were no longer simply as members of the British Army, we were ANZACS.
     
  7. DonBilly

    DonBilly Guest

    A medal awarded to my partner great grand-father for his participation to Dardanelles Battle, a.k.a. Gallipoli for you guys.

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  8. paretrooper

    paretrooper Guest

    well if you go by sky's history channel only oz were in the ANZACS :%#%#:

    donbilly as BLR has stated we did fight in the boer wars and maori wars together
    but we where still "british" but in Gallipoli was were we came to age as two nations.
    the ANZACS went on to fight at the Somme.

    BLR little do you guys in the Federation of Australian states relise that you are under the
    rule of the EVIL ice queen Hellen clarke MUHAHAHAHA and the maori all ready have
    put in a claim that bondi beach is trible land from way back.
     
  9. Ripper

    Ripper Guest

    As long as it stops them making claims they have no right making over here, it's all good.
     
  10. i use to work at a RSA, and anzac day is something special there. bet they were busy haha.
     
  11. jawmalawm24

    jawmalawm24 Guest

    War!!!! what is it good for? absolutely nothing. Say it agaaaain.
     
  12. Don't be silly war is good and dieing as a pawn in a vain grab for power by the few or when they want to sell us pesants oil in the shape of petrol or other "strategic resources" is good <strike>for them</strike>.

    Work! Consume! Die!
     
  13. Prestwick

    Prestwick Guest

    So did the Canadians.

    The point was that ANZAC and Canadian troop numbers in Boer Wars (actually between 1898 and 1902) were quite low. Thus, the Great War is always seen as the genesis of a distinct Canadian, Australian and New Zealand culture respectively as that was the first time that those three Dominions had sent their men in such large numbers overseas to fight in a distant and far away land.

    EDIT: ANZAC day is like Rememberance Day for the UK & Canada and it should be for Ireland as well. It is treated as a day of reflection, politics of the past and the present are cast aside for a collective mourning of such a tragic period of history. Gradually, these events are being extended to cover many other (if not all) conflicts across the globe. For the ANZACs, Vietnam now features while Canada reflects on those who have died across the world serving under the blue flag. Britain remembers its fallen in Bosnia and other peacekeeping missions across the globe.

    The red poppy today symbolises allot of positive things for a good many different reasons. It gives hope because, like the Poppy growing after the chaos on the Somme or on Vimy Ridge, life and humanity can and will always survive and grow back to its previous glory. What sacrifices our forebears may have made in the past we can justify by enjoying life to maximum, doing good deeds or simply by laughing and talking when passing through a Commonwealth War Cementary. They hear us and they smile, for they know that when they gave their today, they know that somehow, somehow it wasn't in vain. And for that they have earnt our everlasting gratitude.
     
  14. snooch

    snooch Guest

    So did the Canadians.

    The point was that ANZAC and Canadian troop numbers in Boer Wars (actually between 1898 and 1902) were quite low. Thus, the Great War is always seen as the genesis of a distinct Canadian, Australian and New Zealand culture respectively as that was the first time that those three Dominions had sent their men in such large numbers overseas to fight in a distant and far away land.

    EDIT: ANZAC day is like Rememberance Day for the UK & Canada and it should be for Ireland as well. It is treated as a day of reflection, politics of the past and the present are cast aside for a collective mourning of such a tragic period of history. Gradually, these events are being extended to cover many other (if not all) conflicts across the globe. For the ANZACs, Vietnam now features while Canada reflects on those who have died across the world serving under the blue flag. Britain remembers its fallen in Bosnia and other peacekeeping missions across the globe.

    The red poppy today symbolises allot of positive things for a good many different reasons. It gives hope because, like the Poppy growing after the chaos on the Somme or on Vimy Ridge, life and humanity can and will always survive and grow back to its previous glory. What sacrifices our forebears may have made in the past we can justify by enjoying life to maximum, doing good deeds or simply by laughing and talking when passing through a Commonwealth War Cementary. They hear us and they smile, for they know that when they gave their today, they know that somehow, somehow it wasn't in vain. And for that they have earnt our everlasting gratitude.
    [/b][/quote]

    You're right on how ANZAC day now incorporates all of the different conflicts, but at all the services I've been to I've never really heard anything mentioned about the war on terror. Could be just because it's still going on, but I hope it doesn't turn into another Vietnam.
     
  15. After attending Anzac day at Anzac cove this year - I have to say how ittle I knew about our history and what occured there.

    Much respect to the Turks and to Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, the TUrkish commander who defeated the British, French, Anzacs, Indian and Canadian forces. He went one to be the first Turkish president and define Turkey as the country we have known in the 20th century. Winston Churchill once stated that every generation produces an outstanding Statesmen/General/Political genius, and it was our misfortune that he was the enemy!

    In the early 1920's he also made a famous speech which I fund very moving.

    Those heroes that shed their blood
    And lost their lives...
    You are now lying in the soil of a friendly Country.
    Therefore rest in peace.
    There is no difference between the Johnnies
    And the Mehmets to us where they lie side by side
    Here in this country of ours...
    You, the mothers,
    Who sent their sons from far away countries
    Wipe away your tears,
    Your sons are now lying in our bosom
    And are in peace
    After having lost their lives on this land
    They have become our sons as well


    At the main dawn ceremony, many wreaths were laid. Off the top of my head they were from Britain, Australia, New Zealand, India, Malaysia, Ireland, France and there were a few others as well.

    Being there fully made me appreciate the significance the Dardanelles campaign, the terrific and tragic loss of life (on both sides - Turks lost 2-1 men in their defense) and the extraordinary respect all countries involved have for each other.

    By the way, to give credit to some I think has been a bit of a pratt in the past... Winston Peters did an awesome job representing NZ and gave an awesome speech at Canuuk Bair. Any Judy Bailey is on the hottest 50 somethings I know!
     
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