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Who is interesting about translation rugby terms English/French/Spanish?

igorBastia

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Oct 15, 2011
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France

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Biarritz

Every English spoken people know that is language is the international language (until Chinese) and don't have make an effort to try another language (except some as sir Wilkinson and madame Jane Birkin, ah! this charming English accent!!! it's so nice, you get all the french women you want!don't need a Porch ). But I think some are curious to the other people. In another hand Frenchmen, Spanish spoken men need to communicate with the English counterpart and I speak for myself I need to improve my English. I really love English as language as well the German language. So who are agree to make a kind of multilingual rugby dictionary?
 
The only French rugby term I know is "Essai", and that's just because of the Welsh shirt that said "Try Essai" on it, when they weren't allowed to have "Brains SA" on their shirts because of the alcohol sponsor laws/rules in France

I've always wondered whether players going to play euro/international rugby have to have specific "English for Rugby" lessons so they can understand what the ref is going on about
 
Would love a bit of German terms thrown in too :p am off to study in a university somewhere in Germany next year and would love to find a rugby team, would be great to be able to communicate through German while doing so too! More than happy to throw some Welsh ones in too!

Know a couple of the French ones from using the French language mode on the RWC2011 game.
Essais - Try
Transformation - Conversion
Melee - Scrum
Demi - Melee - Scrum Half
Troisieme Ligne - Back Row (may have spelled that horrifically wrong :p)

Probably should leave that to the French people anyway :D

Also 'Meta' is try in Italian right?
 
I only know all of the English and French terms. Honestly, more people should make an effort to learn both.
 
Would love a bit of German terms thrown in too :p am off to study in a university somewhere in Germany next year and would love to find a rugby team, would be great to be able to communicate through German while doing so too! More than happy to throw some Welsh ones in too!

Know a couple of the French ones from using the French language mode on the RWC2011 game.
Essais - Try
Transformation - Conversion
Melee - Scrum
Demi - Melee - Scrum Half
Troisieme Ligne - Back Row (may have spelled that horrifically wrong :p)

Probably should leave that to the French people anyway :D

Also 'Meta' is try in Italian right?
Well done ! You have spelled very well! If there is is an Italian in this forum he can answer for what "meta" mean.
Try in welsh. Why not.;)
 
The only French rugby term I know is "Essai", and that's just because of the Welsh shirt that said "Try Essai" on it, when they weren't allowed to have "Brains SA" on their shirts because of the alcohol sponsor laws/rules in France

I've always wondered whether players going to play euro/international rugby have to have specific "English for Rugby" lessons so they can understand what the ref is going on about
English is definitively the Internationale language of rugby. So the pro from everywhere have too know a minimum knowledge of this language. I'm not a pro I just want to communicate with the others people of this forum if I want to stay on it with a minimum mistakes. Just for the fun.
 
positions

Hooker = Talonneur
Prop = Pilier
(tighthead is pilier droit and loosehead is pilier gauche, litually means pillar)
Lock = Deuxième Ligne
(litually means second line)
Flanker = Troisième Ligne Aile
(litually means third line wing, very often though in French the flanker and 8 is just called troisième ligne)
Number 8 = Troisième Ligne Centre
(litually means third line centre)
Scrum Half = Demi de mêlée
(litually means scrum half)
Fly Half = Demi d'ouverture
(litually means opening half, opening as in playmaker)
Centre = Centre (Very often also referred to as trois-quarts centre, litually centre three quarters)
Wing = Aile
(Also often referred to as trois quarts aile, Winger = Ailier)
Full Back = Arrière
(Litually means back)

Forwards = Avants
Backs = Arrières
 
Try in welsh. Why not.;)

Welsh
Try-Cais
Conversion-Trosiad
Penalty-Cic gosb/Gôl gosb
Drop goal-Gôl adlam
Ruck-Sgarmes
Maul-Sgamres symudol (literally mobile ruck)
Scrum-Sgrym

hooker-bachwr
prop-prop
second row-ail reng
back row-rheng ôl
flanker-blaen asgellwr (literally forward wingers)
number 8-wythwr
scrum half- mewnwr
fly half- maswr
centre- canolwr
winger- asgellwr
full back- cefnwr


I also know the Georgian word for try is 'lelo'.
 
In french, mêlée fermée and mêlée ouverte mean scrum and ruck. Literally, closed and open scrum.

The blind side is called le petit-côté (the small side).

The scrum-half/fly-half combination is called la charnière (literally, the joint... I guess it's closer to 'pivot' in spirit)

An up-and-under is called une chandelle (candel)

A tackle (I'm surprised this one wasn't there yet) is une placage. An flip tackle is un placage cathédrale.

A backhand pass (I think that's what it's called in english... aka the SBW pass) is called une chistera.

A line out is une touche. A touche is also a touch-finder and the touch itself.

This is a good one. The tempo for scrums are "flexion, touchez, stop, entrez !"
 
German words for positions:

1 - Linker Pfeiler
2 - Hakler
3 - Rechter Pfeiler
4, 5 - Zweite-Reihe-Stürmer
6 - Linker Flügelstürmer
7 - Rechter Flügelstürmer
8 - Nummer Acht
9 - Gedrängehalb
10 - Verbindungshalb
11 - Linker Außendreiviertel
12 - Erster Innendreiviertel
13 - Zweiter Innendreiviertel
14 - Rechter Außendreiviertel
15 - Schlussmann
 
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Are they able to shorten these? It must be awful to try and be the commentator and have to announce all these positions in the full.
 
Is eight not Sturm fuhrer in German?

That's a bit like asking if it's "half back" instead of "scrum half". Either one works.

Little Guy said:
Are they able to shorten these? It must be awful to try and be the commentator and have to announce all these positions in the full.

Eh, compared to most words in German they're pretty short words. :p
 
That's a bit like asking if it's "half back" instead of "scrum half". Either one works.



Eh, compared to most words in German they're pretty short words. :p

Yeah the Obbensgruppenfuhrer is one of my favourites, or the Panzerkampfwagen(Tank) LOL, most languages are much "longer" than English though, French usually takes longer especially in written form(before I'm attacked by French speakers, most Canadian packaging has both English and French on it and the French text is almost always longer or less detailed)
 
Have always said Sturm Fuher should be our name for 8 and call the pack Sturm. I mean would you be more afraid of a pack or a storm? Rest of the terms are to them logical apart from left and right flankers which of course makes no sense.
 
Maybe there's a video of Ireland u18's against Germany u18s very bised camera man and editing you'd swear the score was 5-0 germany when in fact it was something like 93-5 Ireland.
 
German words for positions:

1 - Linker Pfeiler
2 - Hakler
3 - Rechter Pfeiler
4, 5 - Zweite-Reihe-Stürmer
6 - Linker Flügelstürmer
7 - Rechter Flügelstürmer
8 - Nummer Acht
9 - Gedrängehalb
10 - Verbindungshalb
11 - Linker Außendreiviertel
12 - Erster Innendreiviertel
13 - Zweiter Innendreiviertel
14 - Rechter Außendreiviertel
15 - Schlussmann

Wehay :D thought somebody would post them up. Dyou speak German out of interest?
Do like the way the Germans stick shorter words together to make longer ones with a different meaning, one of the things I like about studying the language.
 

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