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Llanelli Scarlets current situation...

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Cymro

Guest
Aye someone had better save them!

To be honest I have heared that the WRU are not the ones who are coughing the cash up. I have been told by a source near Llanelli that a businesmen will buy the club and then sell it back to them or give them the money.

I hope they dont go. Probably the most historic rugby side in the Northen Hemeshpire!
 
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loratadine

Guest
yes there is but it would be hard to say which side is the most historically rich side within the nh, i mean cases could be made for sides such as bath and munster, but its all about opinions it is my belief tht the scarlets are the heartbeat of welsh rugby, and are steeped so much in tradition and passion, that they are the most historic club in the nh, but thts just my opinion, and im hugely biased.
 
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SaintsFan_Webby

Guest
:rolleyes:

I love the Llanelli. Saints have had some ***anic matches with them in the Heineken Cup. They are hugely traditional and have a long backlist of great players.

I just wanted to point out that they aren't THE most historic club in the NH. Preston Grasshoppers pre-date them for example.
 
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loratadine

Guest
haha lol

very good

i think he meant historic thought in regards of like tradition and heritage, not so much of the year it was founded.
 
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SaintsFan_Webby

Guest
i think he meant historic thought in regards of like tradition and heritage, not so much of the year it was founded.
[/b]

Surely an older club would have an even greater sense of tradition and heritage?

This is the most pointless debate ever, I knew the initial comment was a mistake.
 
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loratadine

Guest
if somethings older it doesnt mean it has better traditions and customs i mean england are the oldest rugby nation, but have f*** all customs and no tradition compared to the welsh or the all blacks.
 
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SaintsFan_Webby

Guest
The word used was "historic". This implies age, not tradition.

It's also ******** to say that England have no tradition in rugby. Twickenham itself is known as 'the home of rugby'. Pretty traditional if you ask me.

The song 'Swing Low' is also an integral part of English rugby tradition. It's the song of English fans. It gets sung every game.

I don't see that Wales have a greater number of traditions than England, while it is only the Haka which sets NZ apart.

They are all traditional heavyweights of rugby, with pretty much the same rooted tradition.
 
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loratadine

Guest
swing low sweet chariot,can anyone tell me how england begane to sing tht song, i mean serious i really dont know, how did it become and english rugby song and when?
 
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SaintsFan_Webby

Guest
swing low sweet chariot,can anyone tell me how england begane to sing tht song, i mean serious i really dont know, how did it become and english rugby song and when?
[/b]

According to the magic of Wikipedia, it's actually only been associated with England rugby since 1988, which suprised me a little. What a great year for the world that was though.

Originally posted by Wikipedia
Coming into the last match of the 1988 season, against Ireland at Twickenham, they had lost 15 of their previous 23 matches in the Five Nations Championship. The Twickenham crowd had only seen one solitary England try in the previous two years and at half time against Ireland they were 0-3 down. During the second half the floodgates opened and England scored a remarkable six tries in a thumping 35-3 win. Three of the tries came in quick succession from Chris Oti, a black player making his Twickenham debut. A group from the Benedictine school Douai started to sing a rugby club favourite – the gospel hymn Swing Low, Sweet Chariot – in honour of their new hero, the whole crowd joined in. At the next home game, against Australia, a young centre named Will Carling made his debut as England captain in another rousing victory. The England team was about to embark upon a period of great success and Swing Low, Sweet Chariot became synonymous with Twickenham and the England team.
 
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loratadine

Guest
ahhh so swing low isnt reall steeped tht much in history, i thought it went back alot longer thn that.
 
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Cymro

Guest
FFS some people have to go off on one. Llanelli (as much as it pain me to say this) have a very traditional and a pride in Wales. they are the heartbeat and need to be preserved.
 
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SaintsFan_Webby

Guest
FFS some people have to go off on one.[/b]


Originally posted by Me+--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(Me)</div>
This is the most pointless debate ever, I knew the initial comment was a mistake.[/b]

<!--QuoteBegin-Also me

I love the Llanelli. Saints have had some ***anic matches with them in the Heineken Cup. They are hugely traditional and have a long backlist of great players.
 
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edinburgh_gunner

Guest
Perhaps the WRU should do what the SRU did and franchise their top team. There surley business men in Wales who would want to invest in a quality rugby team?
 
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Rugby_Cymru

Guest
That IS how it works in Wales. Our clubs are franchises.
Mike Cuddy owns Ospreys, Stuart Gallacher owns Scarlets (and has now pulled out leaving the WRU to bail them out), Dragon were left by their money man (and the WRU had to bail them out), and i can't remember who's the big money man in Blues.

It is a very unstable way for our professionals to live when these guys can just pull out whenever they get uncomfortable.
Financially speaking Ospreys are the only club that could survive on their own feet now without their money man.
 
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