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NZ Fans Warned

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stevemagoo

Guest
The New Zealand public are being warned that their employers have no reason to treat them leniently if they take sick days due to World Cup games.

Bill Hodge, a law professor at Auckland University, made the warning after a union leader had encouraged employers to take a lenient stance with staff coming in late or taking sick days. The comments were made by the leader as most of the All Black games start at around midnight in New Zealand.

Mr Hodge said there is nothing in the Employment Relations Act about workers staying up late to watch sporting events like the World Cup.

His argument stated that larger companies may be able to cope with the absentees or employees working flexible hours but smaller businesses, the heart of the New Zealand business sector, will not be able to cope.

"The small employers have customers coming in at 8.30. They need someone there," Hodge told The New Zealand Herald.

Hodge went on to explain the issue relates to the relationship between the employer and the employee, and whether or not the business can survive without a full staff compliment.

"Does it mean that non-rugby fans carry New Zealand during this period?" Hodge said.

Engineering, Printing and Manufacturing Union national secretary Andrew Little said employers need to realise that some workers will be "a little sluggish or some may call in sick" after watching a game of rugby late at night.

"We're saying, 'Just go easy'. People are going to get caught up in the fervour of the thing and we hope employers are more accommodating than they otherwise might be," Mr Little said.

He said it is the national game but conceded some small companies may struggle.

"However difficult it might be, they're just going to have to be accommodating. That doesn't mean to say they have to tolerate out-and-out breaches but people will be enthusiastic," Mr Little said.
 
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shtove

Guest
The New Zealand public are being warned that ...



... suicide might be an overreaction to their team's defeat.
 
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BokMagic

Guest
Interesting question- if NZ wins the RWC, the NZ economy will probably lose billions, as the entire nation collectively celebrates the win, and you`ll have exactly 5 people in NZ turning up for work on the Monday afterwards- and even they will be severely hung over.

If NZ doesn`t win the RWC, the NZ economy will probably lose billions, as the entire nation collectively drowns their sorrows, and you`ll have exactly 5 people in NZ turning up for work on the Monday- and even they will be severely hung over.

So, which scenario will the economists prefer?
 
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Prestwick

Guest
The New Zealand public are being warned that ...



... offering Bryan Habana fizzy drinks and lots of food minutes before kick off is neither big nor clever.
 
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InsaneAsylum

Guest
<div class='quotemain'> if nz win, they will all hit the **** and boost australias economy :p [/b]

Because they think Foster's contains alcohol?

[/b][/quote]

nah we export fosters to the uk because they're the only people stupid enough to drink it :p
 
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BokMagic

Guest
<div class='quotemain'> <div class='quotemain'> if nz win, they will all hit the **** and boost australias economy :p [/b]

Because they think Foster's contains alcohol?

[/b][/quote]

nah we export fosters to the uk because they're the only people stupid enough to drink it :p
[/b][/quote] Too true mate. Us Saffas drink Castle and **** Foster`s.....
 
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chinstroker

Guest
I agree, rugby is big in NZ, I've noticed that after being in Australia & the UK. But not like its religion or something as people portray it.
 
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esoj

Guest
I had friends back in nz that hated rugby so there defintely are non-rugby fans in nz. Rugby though is defintely still the no1 sport and proabbly will be for sometime.

I can though defintely see league picking up more if the Warriors have another good season,especially a good start to the season. there last few games at home they got some massive crowds.
 
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jawmalawm24

Guest
I think Rugby's losing numbers in Nz because parents are putting there kids into other sports like soccer, cricket, hockey etc because their kids can't compete with 6'2 240 pound 15 year olds. Players are alot more athletic then back in the days and much bigger so its not really suited for the small man these days though there are exceptions.
 
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scuubasteve

Guest
All sport is struggling in NZ these days. There are so many other things to do apart from sport that its enevitable that people don't follow rugby with as much passion as 50years ago.

It's also true that Rugby is strongest in the provinces. Participation rates and fan support are still strongest (per capita) in the more rural provinces in NZ. Places like Southland, Manawatu, Hawkes Bay and Taranaki have less to compete with Rugby as a primary entertainment spectacle. Auckland on the contrary (and particularly North Harbour) doesn't get as many people due to a couple of factors.

One is that there are more things to compete with. Music concerts being an obvious one. But also, the major metropolitan areas tend to have the biggest concentrations of migrants, usually from Nations where rugby isn't well known (India, China). So, as immigration trends continue, first generation Kiwi's won't have as much to do with rugby as traditional Kiwi's.

But as with anything, once people become emmersed in the cultures of their new home, then they will start to take more notice of traditions. Rugby being a big one in NZ.

The mass marketing and media converage of rugby these days makes it almost impossible for people to ignore the game without deliberately ignoring it. It is these people, who make an effort to not follow or enjoy rugby (or usually sports in general) that will say they hate rugby.

It is also true that Polynesian kids tend to mature faster and are bigger at a younger age. Due to this fact of nature, simple age grade rugby has made it difficult for kids of European decent to compete and for their parents (mothers of course) to fear that little Jonny will get hurt. So a lot of European kids turn away from the game before they can compete equally.

New initiatives from the NZRU to introduce weight grade rugby comps should alleviate some of this issue. As will the new game of 'Ripper Rugby' which is the one where you have a 'flag' (hankerchief like cloth hanging out of each pocket) and instead of getting tackled, the opposition has to pull one of these 'flags' . This takes the contact factor out of the game for kids.
 
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Brodizzle

Guest
New initiatives from the NZRU to introduce weight grade rugby comps should alleviate some of this issue. As will the new game of 'Ripper Rugby' which is the one where you have a 'flag' (hankerchief like cloth hanging out of each pocket) and instead of getting tackled, the opposition has to pull one of these 'flags' . This takes the contact factor out of the game for kids.
[/b]
Wouldn't touch rugby be equally effective?
 
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scuubasteve

Guest
Sort off. But its alot easier to tag a player than get the flag. It basically teaches better technique, rather than just throwing an arm out to get someone. That's how you end up with a tackling technique like Schalk Burger!
 
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RowanJ

Guest
One of the problems in New Zealand is that the All blacks have become so big and the players celebrities. so many people just don't care about anything else other than Carter and McCaw.
I'm talking mostly about aucklanders I suppose, but I find people from england or south africa seem more clued up about provincial stuff than the average kiwi.
 
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honef

Guest
It is also true that Polynesian kids tend to mature faster and are bigger at a younger age. Due to this fact of nature, simple age grade rugby has made it difficult for kids of European decent to compete and for their parents (mothers of course) to fear that little Jonny will get hurt. So a lot of European kids turn away from the game before they can compete equally.

New initiatives from the NZRU to introduce weight grade rugby comps should alleviate some of this issue. As will the new game of 'Ripper Rugby' which is the one where you have a 'flag' (hankerchief like cloth hanging out of each pocket) and instead of getting tackled, the opposition has to pull one of these 'flags' . This takes the contact factor out of the game for kids. [/quote]



They used weight grading when I was young, I found it hard as I was graded to play with older Kids my size, however I never had the mental toughness at that age and I struggled.
 
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Brodizzle

Guest
I personally believe that the south island is more Rugby crazy than the north
[/b]
Ohhhh, then that explains how the Carisbrook crowds have been pretty bad for the last few years, with people preferring to watch it at home....Canterbury doesn't make up all of the South Island....
 

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