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Rogers goes back to league

T

The TRUTH

Guest
Rogers released to Titans

The Australian and New South Wales Rugby Unions have granted Wallaby utility back Mat Rogers an immediate release from his contract on compassionate grounds.


The dual international signed to play rugby league with new club the Gold Coast Titans in 2008 and is now free to join the club a year earlier than expected.


The Titans have urged Rogers to consider his personal issues before thinking about the next phase of his sporting career.


The Gold Coast said it will not begin contract negotiations with Rogers until after the Christmas period.

http://au.news.yahoo.com/061214/21/11rqe.html[/b]

Not a huge loss for the Wallabies but a massive blow for the Tahs to lose their star player this close to the start of the new season.

Thank for the memories Mat.... one of the most exciting Super12/14 players ever... you will be missed.



I guess this opens the door for Kurtley Beale to make his Super Rugby debut a little earlier than expected.
 
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ALLBLACKS

Guest
Now you guys can start Preparing Kurtley Beale to be the Best Fly Half ever according to AUS.
 
P

Prestwick

Guest
Obviously poor Rogers is still smarting from getting nailed hard by Josh Lewsey.
 
T

The TRUTH

Guest
Obviously poor Rogers is still smarting from getting nailed hard by Josh Lewsey.
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This made him feel better....

ausveng190mm1.jpg





Kurtley Beale? Who's he?[/b]

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position: flyhalf

height: 184cm

weight: 86kg

age: 17

Kurtley Beale comes to the Waratahs from renowned Sydney Rugby nursery St. Joseph’s College, where he played first VX in 2004, 05 and 06.

An ultra-talented flyhalf whose silky skills have been compared to those of Mark Ella and Stephen Larkham, Beale signed with the Waratahs while still in year 11 at school. Captain of the Australian Schoolboys in 2006, Beale is set to tour with the squad to Fiji and New Zealand over September and October and will join the Waratahs after the completion of his High School Certificate examinations.


from the tahs website
 
B

BokMagic

Guest
Quie a loss for the Wallabies IMO- great back-up to Latham at fullback. Was he maybe just a bit ****** off at moving between flyhalf/centre during the November internationals, or did he hear some vicious rumour that he was being considered as the Wallaby answer to their ongoing problems in the loosehead prop position?

Anyway, real rugby`s loss is diet rugby`s gain- I personally really rated Rogers as a player, always unpredictable and always quite a threat with ball in hand. Thanks for the memories.
 
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ALLBLACKS

Guest
Well from what Ive seen. Kurtley Beale will be the fastest 1st 5 in the World or already is, As he is a schoolboy sprint champ according to a few Rugby reports. His pass is right up there deadly accurate and fast. I watched him kick a perfect game against Newington this yr. He didnt impress though when playing against the NZ schoolboys.
 
R

Ripper

Guest
I've been hearing about Kurtley Beale since about 2003/2004 when he was only 15 years old - he better be worth all this hype.
 
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ALLBLACKS

Guest
He is a exceptional Talent. Sometimes he tries to do too much on his own though. When watching him against Newington, Arguably the second best 1st XV in Sydneys Comp. Beales Passing and kciking is what won the game. He took over the game by himself sometimes with little Linking up plays or just chipping it to himself. Took care of Tonga on the schoolboy tour with 4 tries. Didnt do too much agiants NZ, sometimes trying too much by himself it seemed. Remember he has been training with the Wallabies and Larkham wants him to continue to train with them as Larkham said he is an exceptional Talent. the Next Ella and Larkham Combined.
 
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scot

Guest
All this chat is doing the kid no good. It seems pretty ridiculous to me to be labelling him better than Ella and Larkham, two of the greatest flyhalves to play the game, when he hasn't even kicked a ball in a professional game of footy.

There's a young Queenslander, signed with the Reds this year, who is of about equal ability judging from the games I've seen, yet barely a word has been raised about him. Both should get game time this year, so we will see.

Anyway, I think you'll find after the Super 14 finishes that Berrick Barnes is the clear stand out to fill the shoes of Stevie Larkham.
 
T

The TRUTH

Guest
Anyway, I think you'll find after the Super 14 finishes that Berrick Barnes is the clear stand out to fill the shoes of Stevie Larkham.
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It was pretty clear after this years Super14, it's just a shame he and SNK got injured before the november tour.

Lets hope so... Australia are dangerously in need of a class 10.[/b]

Well we may have 3 or 4 if McKenzie does the right thing and plays SNK or Beale instead of that little hack Halangahu.


Wallabies are gonna have a stupid amount of quility 10's by the time of the 2011 WC...

Beale
Barnes
Cooper
SNK
Lealiifano
Giteau
 
A

ALLBLACKS

Guest
All this chat is doing the kid no good. It seems pretty ridiculous to me to be labelling him better than Ella and Larkham, two of the greatest flyhalves to play the game, when he hasn't even kicked a ball in a professional game of footy.

There's a young Queenslander, signed with the Reds this year, who is of about equal ability judging from the games I've seen, yet barely a word has been raised about him. Both should get game time this year, so we will see.

Anyway, I think you'll find after the Super 14 finishes that Berrick Barnes is the clear stand out to fill the shoes of Stevie Larkham.
[/b]


Ella is his Trainer and Manager, And the Words were not of him being better, But Ella and Larkham speaking of his potential.
 
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scot

Guest
<div class='quotemain'>
All this chat is doing the kid no good. It seems pretty ridiculous to me to be labelling him better than Ella and Larkham, two of the greatest flyhalves to play the game, when he hasn't even kicked a ball in a professional game of footy.

There's a young Queenslander, signed with the Reds this year, who is of about equal ability judging from the games I've seen, yet barely a word has been raised about him. Both should get game time this year, so we will see.

Anyway, I think you'll find after the Super 14 finishes that Berrick Barnes is the clear stand out to fill the shoes of Stevie Larkham.
[/b]


Ella is his Trainer and Manager, And the Words were not of him being better, But Ella and Larkham speaking of his potential.
[/b][/quote]

Your words were "the Next Ella and Larkham Combined". To me that says he is going to be better than both Ella and Larkham.
 
A

ALLBLACKS

Guest
Well Ella is his trainer and Manager and Ella said he would be known as one of if not th greatest Fly Half of Australian Rugby. Larkham said he wants him in the wallabies squad so i guess equal saying
 
T

The TRUTH

Guest
They compared him to Mark Ella and Larkham because thats what he looks like when he plays.... i mix of the two.

Doesn't necessarily mean he's gonna be better than those two legends, although it would probably be fair to say he's better than they were at the same age.
 
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scot

Guest
All I'm saying is putting such pressure on the lad at only 17 years of age can only be a bad thing.
 
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sanzar

Guest
All I'm saying is putting such pressure on the lad at only 17 years of age can only be a bad thing.
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It all depends... some people thrive on pressure! Brad Fittler had tonnes of accolades and pressure thrown on him at the age of 19 and just kept producing... though it's fair to say his best footy came when he'd matured.
 
T

The TRUTH

Guest
Ella's wise words keep Beale on ground


Master and the apprentice: Glen Ella has been looking out for young star Kurtley Beale.
ellaandbeale_rugbyheaven__350x311.jpg


As an extremely gifted young Aborigine making a rapid rise through the rugby ranks, Kurtley Beale could not have a better life coach than Glen Ella, Daniel Lane writes.

On the field, schoolboy sensation Kurtley Beale can sum up a situation in a split second like few other players. Now, as Beale counts down the months before he leaves school, former Wallaby Glen Ella is doing all he can to ensure the 17-year-old makes all the right moves off the pitch.

Ella first laid eyes on the code's hottest prospect when Beale played for St Joseph's College 13As at Centennial Park.

He told those who'd listen that he'd spotted a future superstar, but what Ella kept close to his chest was that he'd met a kid - an Aboriginal kid, no less - whose vast potential he could help maximise.

"I could see a great kid and a talented athlete," he says.

"It was always just going to be a matter of keeping him on the right track because I knew things would come to fruition at the end."

Five years later, and with the world at the teenager's flashy feet, the bond between Ella and Beale runs deep. They're not related but quietly spoken Beale uses the word "family" to describe the relationship he and Ella enjoy.

"He's been an adviser and a role model," Beale says.

"He's given me knowledge about the world and he's also helped protect me from things, like barring the media from doing interviews."

For Ella there's an obvious pride in having watched Beale develop into not just a breathtaking athlete but a young man described by his peers as a "natural leader" and "champion".

"I guess you could say there has been a bit of parenting," Ella says of his role.

"It's just been about giving him advice and that's pretty much been for Kurtley to be himself."

Ella, who with his brothers Mark and Gary formed an Australian rugby dynasty in the early-to-mid 1980s, calls on their experiences whenever he needs to help Beale cope with the load of being a schoolboy football star.

"He has the same expectations on him as we did when we were coming through," he says.

"Kurtley has a great attitude in that he just lets it happen. I guess he knows there's no need to go chasing football success because it will happen.

"He's a level-headed kid so he handles the expectation.

"He's quiet, he's shy and that is the way he wants to be. He lets his football do the talking.

"Some of the things he says about not being rushed during a match and not looking at other players to take after are the things my brothers and I talked about."

The Ella brothers were placed under a fair amount of scrutiny, but Beale's spotlight has been blinding.

He's spent the first three days of his school holidays training with the Wallabies at Coffs Harbour. There are suggestions he could tour Europe with the Wallabies in five months. He appears destined to play for the Waratahs next year.

"You have to switch on and off," is how Ella says athletes need to deal with such situations.

"The good thing is Kurtley can switch off and relax. He really doesn't let too much get to him."

But he also cops it in the school playground. While much of it is good-natured stirring by friends, there are kids who want to talk about the prospect of the great things to come. "Kids talk about Wallabies and Waratahs, and I just say, 'Yeah, yeah' and agree with them," Beale says.

"I have little personal goals. Some of them are long term, but at the moment I'm just trying to win the GPS competition with St Joseph's."

Beale was born at Blacktown, played junior rugby league at Mount Druitt and at 13, thanks to a sporting scholarship, became a boarder at tradition-steeped Joey's at Hunters Hill. School teammate Richie Gray, who has been selected for the NSW schoolboys, says while Beale appears to take the attention in his stride, it's difficult for other kids not to get caught up in the hype.

"Everyone looks up to Kurtley," he says. "They try to follow his lead and strive for good things off the field.

"I play inside him - right off Kurtley's hip - and he's great. He can throw the ball and run lines. He's also a good leader. Before a game he instructs us to remain relaxed and give our best."

Beale's depth of character could stem from his upbringing as an Aborigine in Sydney's western suburbs. He nominates legal studies as the school subject that appeals to him most - "knowing your rights and all that kind of stuff".

"It's interesting," he says. "I know there's a lot of cousins [Aborigines] who've been in trouble.

"The course lets us know what it's like in jail. We went to Maitland prison and it was scary.

"I know a lot of cousins who've been there and what they've told me about it is frightening."

With Beale, it's not just all about rugby. Ella and his business partner Rob Horton, who has also helped as a mentor, know these things are all part of the his life education.

"We are preparing him for life after St Joseph's," Horton says. "Kurtley has been protected by the school and the big walls that surround it. The next two years will be a demanding period for him.

"The world is open to him and people - especially media - will have much more access to him than they've had in the past few years. But Kurtley is his own man and he has to make decisions. But I'm certain he'll always listen to advice."

As he packed to attend Camp Wallaby, Ella - the Australian sevens coach - crammed in plenty of advice.

"You'll probably cop a bit of stirring from the blokes - they'll stir the crap out of you - but you'll have to handle it; even give a bit back," he said.

"But when they're out on the training pitch they'll be striving for excellence. Also, Stevie Larkham has a game similar to yours in that you run, pass and distribute. He doesn't say much but when he does talk, listen to everything he has to say."

Beale's biggest concern about being among the game's elite was that he might drop the ball during skill work. But that hasn't been a problem, on or off the paddock.
http://www.rugbyheaven.smh.com.au/news/int...1174448363.html
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